2021 Board Election

In June, the Copyright Agency sought nominations from members for three elected Board Director positions – that of Author Director, Artist Director and Publisher Director.

Incumbents, artist Dr Oliver Watts and publisher Jane Curry, will remain on the Board as their positions have not been contested.

The three people running for the Author Director role are the incumbent journalist and author Adele Ferguson, investigative journalist Anthony Klan and journalist Chris Pash.

voting information

The ballot for the election of one Author Director opens on Friday 22 October 2021, we invite all of Copyright Agency’s author members to vote. Members with a valid email address will receive voting information from BigPulse, an online polling provider. All other members will receive a letter providing instruction on how to participate in voting.

The voting ballot closes midnight Monday 22 November 2021.

Candidate information

Biography

Journalist and author with a wide range of experience, including as a business commentator and an investigative reporter for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age and The Financial Review and presented major investigations for the ABC’s Four Corners and 7.30. Multiple awards include the Gold Walkley and Graham Perkin Journalist of the Year. Author of the best-selling unauthorised biography Gina Rinehart: The Richest Woman in the World and Banking bad. Currently a Director of the Walkley Foundation and was made a member of the Order of Australia in 2019.

Comment on nomination

As a working journalist and author I am deeply committed to standing up for the rights of creators. I have had the privilege of serving two terms on the board and seek your support for a third and final term to continue the good work of the agency.

In an era of digital disruption where our culture is being tested as never before, I would like to continue to advocate for fair payment for the work of members. As a director I was part of the decision making that enabled the overhaul systems and processes to improve transparency and efficiency for members. As a director of the Cultural Fund we provided further funding to help our members during Covid. With so many challenges we need a strong Copyright Agency to protect your interests. So please vote for continuity and experience.

Biography

Anthony Klan is a senior investigative journalist, with 20 years in the industry. He holds Australia’s top journalism award, a Walkley Award, for business journalism, and has been named a finalist for the Graham Perkin Australian Journalist of the Year.

He is founding editor of investigative news site The Klaxon and is also currently writing for the Financial Times.

Klan has worked across numerous publications including The Australian, The Wall Street Journal, The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age and the ABC.

His predominate focus is investigative financial journalism, for which his work is well recognised, though his expertise spans a wide range of topics.

Most recently, Klan has been named a finalist at the 2021 Kennedy Awards for Journalism, for exposing systemic wrongdoing involving the public sector and several of the nation’s major banks.

Comment on nomination

As an investigative financial journalist for over a decade, and holding a Commerce degree in accounting and finance, I have an acute eye for detail.

I have well-developed skills in identifying where potential problems exist within corporate entities, such as Copyright Agency, and where performance can be improved.

In recent years Copyright Agency has made some advancements, particularly regarding proactive Copyright Tribunal proceedings, but there’s far more work to be done – and much faster.

My key focus is improving the equitable and efficient distribution of funds to authors.

I intend to work constructively with fellow directors and management in achieving this goal.

My biggest strength is that, along with my tenacity and deep understanding of finance, I bring fresh eyes to Copyright Agency and its workings.

I will fight tirelessly for authors’ rights.

Authors underpin Copyright Agency’s entire revenue and are Copyright Agency’s sole reason for existence.

They deserve no less.

It’s been six years under the incumbent – it’s time for change.

The Copyright Agency needs directors with the expertise to make sensible commercial judgments on behalf of Members. The mission of the Copyright Agency is fair payment to creators. It’s all about maximising returns for Members.

Chris Pash, a working editor and journalist, combines creative credentials plus experience and success at extracting maximum value — dollars — from words.

The long-time MEAA member, author, editor and chief executive, has started and brought to profit businesses based on rights management of content.

He has extensive governance experience and is a Graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

He knows the workings of the Copyright Agency, previously serving a term as an Australian Society of Authors-appointed director.

And he has championed the interests of writers, as a director (10 years) and chair (2 years) of the Australian Society of Authors, and director (4 years) of the newspaper body PANPA (Pacific Area Newspaper Publishers’ Association).

And he has a successful commercial record with content, starting as the founding CEO in the 1990s of the joint venture company Asia Pulse, building a profitable business creating and licensing news to databases, financial platforms and media monitoring firms.

At Factiva, a Dow Jones and Reuters joint venture, as Director of Content Strategy, he built the world’s deepest and most extensive database of news and information from Asia Pacific, sending millions of dollars to content creators.

And later, as Director of Content Licensing for Dow Jones, he negotiated commercial licensing agreements with the biggest publishers and broadcasters in Australia and Asia.

His book, The Last Whale (Fremantle Press 2008), a narrative nonfiction account about the Save the Whale movement in the 1970s and the last days of whaling in Australia, is based on his time as a cadet journalist at the Albany Advertiser, Western Australia.